Altering the make-up of bacteria in the gut through diet, pro-and prebiotic supplements, faecal matter transplants or antibiotics might reduce the symptoms of autism

Altering the make-up of bacteria in the gut through diet, pro-and prebiotic supplements, faecal matter transplants or antibiotics might reduce the symptoms of autism

Beijing,June27:A new research – The findings of which were published in the journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience – has suggested that altering the make-up of bacteria in the gut through diet, pro-and prebiotic supplements, faecal matter transplants or antibiotics might reduce the symptoms of autism. The findings are based on a review of more than 150 papers, all related to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and gut bacteria.

Restoring a healthy balance in gut bacteria can treat ASD symptoms
Many studies have previously shown that restoring a healthy balance in gut bacteria can treat ASD symptoms and this review highlighted the conclusion. “Efforts to restore the gut microbiota to that of a healthy person has been shown to be really effective” explained Qinrui Li of Peking University, China. “Our review looked at taking probiotics, prebiotics, changing the diet — for example, to gluten — and casein-free diets, and faecal matter transplants. All had a positive impact on symptoms,” Li added. These include increased sociability, a reduction in repetitive behaviour, and improved social communication, all of which are hugely beneficial to the life of an ASD sufferer.

The number of people being diagnosed with ASD is on the rise
“To date there are no effective therapies to treat this range of brain developmental disorders,” Li pointed out. “The number of people being diagnosed with ASD is on the rise. As well as being an expensive condition to manage, ASD has a huge emotional and social cost on families of sufferers,” Li said. Problems like diarrhoea, constipation and flatulence are commonly reported in ASD and thus, the link between the gut and ASD is well-known among sufferers. The root of gastro-intestinal problems like these is an imbalance of “good” and “bad” bacteria in the gut. Many of the papers reviewed support the idea of a gut-brain axis – a way in which factors in the gut can affect processes in the brain.

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