Asian wild silkworms well suits to repair the central nervous system, spine related issues

Asian wild silkworms well suits to repair the central nervous system, spine related issues

London, October 27: Researchers from University of Oxford discovered that cleaned and sterilised silk from Asian wild silkworms could repair spine related issues.

As spinal nerves are unable to cross the scar tissue barrier, there is no cure for serious spinal cord trauma.

The new discovery claims that modified silk from Antheraea pernyi (AP) silk spinner can scaffold bridging the spinal injury cavity. It also supports nerve growth across the damaged region. The discovery by researchers from University of Aberdeen and University of Oxford collaborated with Oxford Biomaterials Ltd.

Prof. Fritz Vollrath from the University of Oxford asserted that the new discovery is an another example of the value of silks and their derivatives in modern medicine. It acts as the natural regeneration for healing major as well as minor wounds.

The modified AP silk has the correct rigidity. It does not trigger a response by the immune system cells that would be present in the spinal cord. Over time it gradually degrades.

Repairing the central nervous system, the discovery is potentially an important step towards the holy grail of medicine.

Dr Wenlong Huang, from the University of Aberdeen asserted that these are still early bench-based studies. But it showed the fantastic properties of AP silk, being suitable for spinal repair. Scientists are looking forward to research further on the same.

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