Simple cell carry 42 million protein molecules; new study explains

After years of extensive data analysis and study about yeast cell protein abundance, scientists from the University of Toronto’s Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research found that there are some 42 million protein molecules in a simple cell.

The study about the protein number has been doing the rounds lately and now for the first time, they were able to establish a data backed up number of 42 million for the baseline number of those molecules in such a cell. Dr, Brown, who is behind this analysis said that, ‘Given that the cell is the functional unit of biology, it’s just a natural curiosity to want to know what’s in there and how much of each kind’.

This study was done in collaboration with Anastasia Baryshnikova, a U of T alum and now Principal Investigator at Calico, a California biotechnology company that focuses on aging. This study could be a breakthrough for the people who are actively searching for intriguing fact behind the aging and cell reproduction. This study was a hectic task for the people who participated in this and according to Brandon Ho, a student of the University of Toronto- “It was hard to conceptualize how many proteins there are in the cell because the data was reported on drastically different scales,”.

Research lead grant Brown explains this work “the cell is the functional unit of biology, it’s just a natural curiosity to want to know what’s in there and how much of each kind”. After extracting the data, the researcher team were able to glean insights into the mechanisms by which cells control the abundance of distinct proteins, paving the way for similar studies in human cells that could help reveal molecular roots of disease. Anyhow the research team consider this as a start to find more about the cell partition and their effect and according to Robert Nash, Senior Biocurator of the Saccharomyces Genome Database

Top