Two Indians win National Geographic ‘Nature Photographer Of The Year’

London,Dec12:National Geographic has announced the winners of the ‘Nature Photographer Of The Year’ after scrutinising photos for twelve weeks. The stunning images reveal how wonderful our nature is and these gorgeous pics were captured after spending several hours watching the nature. Some of the scenes are once in a life opportunity and photographers were able to capture them in their camera and send it to National Geographic for the competition. Two Indian photograhers are Prasenjee Yadav for landscaping and Varun Aditya from Maharashtra for pine snake got their work recognized by National Geographic

Action

1. Sardine Run

Greg Lecoeur won the Grand Prize in the action category for his astonishing photo in which sardines are getting preyed upon by cape gannet birds and common dolphins. The remarkable view was captured just at the right moment when dolphins and gannet birds began hunting in Port Saint John’s, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Lecoeur explains that dolphins first started the hunting followed by the gannet birds diving in a free fall from 30 to 40 meters high, piercing the surface of the water head first at a speed of 80km/h to get their fill of sardines.

Sardine Run. The image is captured by Gred Lecoeur, which won the first place in Action category. (Source: National Geographic)

2. Approach

Second prize went to Tori Shea-Ostberg who captured an EF2 tornado moving towards a home in Wray, Colorado on May 7, 2016. The killer tornado was moving on the fields and gulped the house. Tori was watching it from a distance and saw a lady coming out of the basement. Luckily no one died in the incident, but Tori was able to shot a stunning photo worthy of the second prize.

Approach. The second prize winning photo by Shea-Ostberg. It was also submitted in Action Category. (Source: National Geographic)
Approach. The second prize winning photo by Shea-Ostberg. It was also submitted in Action Category. (Source: National Geographic)

3. Great Egrets Take Flight

Third prize was won by Zsolt Kudich whose photo depicts a remarkable conservation success story. His photo shows the survival of Great Egret birds in Balatonhídvégpuszta, Zala, Hungary. Only 31 mating pairs of Great Egret were left back in 1921 in Hungary. However, due to active international conservation efforts we were able to save them from getting extinct and there are over 3000 mating pairs a century later.

Great Egrets Take Flight. The third prize winning image by Zsolt Kudich under the Action category. (Source: National Geographic)
Great Egrets Take Flight. The third prize winning image by Zsolt Kudich under the Action category. (Source: National Geographic)

Honourable Mention

While Honourable Mention went to Scott Portelli who shot beautiful snap of green turtles devouring the soft tentacles of a jellyfish in Byron Bay, New South Wales, Australia. Jellyfish are a common food source for many turtles.

Jellyfish Feast. Photo clicked and captioned by Scott Portelli
Jellyfish Feast. Photo clicked and captioned by Scott Portelli. (Source: National Geographic)

National Geographic also presented awards in three other categories — landscapes, animal portraits and environmental issues.

Landscape

1. Struggle of life

Jacob Kaptein won the first prize in landscape category. The breathtaking photo of little beech in the water trying to survive in harsh conditions was shot at Leuvenum, Gelderland, Netherlands. Kaptein says that he went to the site for several days and on one evening all the conditions were satisfactory to get the out of the world shot.

Struggle of life. This mesmerising pic was captured by Jacob Kaptein. It won the first place in Landscape category. (Source: National Geographic)
Struggle of life. This mesmerising pic was captured by Jacob Kaptein. It won the first place in Landscape category. (Source: National Geographic)

2. Wild rink

The second prize went to Alessandro Gruzza who captured the ‘Wild rink’ showing a beautiful landscape of cold winter days and movement of the clouds around Mt. Cimon de la Pala, Paneveggio-Pale San Martino Natural Park, Italy.

Wild rink. Alessandro Gruzza snapped this picture and submitted in the Landscape category. It won second place. (Source: National Geographic)
Wild rink. Alessandro Gruzza snapped this picture and submitted in the Landscape category. It won second place. (Source: National Geographic)

3. Pacific Storm

Santiago Borja won the third price from shooting out of the world image of ‘Pacific Storm’. Borga captured the stunning image of thunderstorm brewing above the Pacific Ocean while the plane was en route to South America. Borja said, “I like this photo so much because you can feel the amazing size of the storm and its power. But at the same time, it’s wonderful how peacefully you can fly around it in still air without touching it.”

Pacific Storm. This amazing pic of bolt of lightening shooted from the plane over Pacific Ocean, showing how lighting builds up in the sky and flashes in the sky. Santiago Borja was able to capture the moment just at the right time. This image won won third place in the Landscape category. (Source: National Geographic)
Pacific Storm. This amazing pic of a bolt of lightening shot from the plane over the Pacific Ocean, showing how lighting builds up in the sky and flashes in the sky. Santiago Borja was able to capture the moment just at the right time. This image won third place in the Landscape category. (Source: National Geographic)

Honourable Mention

India’s Prasenjee Yadav received the honourable mention in the landscape category for capturing the green meteor rushing towards earth. He explained that the camera was set at 15s exposure for 999 shots and this came into one of those shots and he felt like the luckiest photographer of the world for those 15 seconds.

Serendipitous Green Meteor. Photo clicked and captioned by Prasenjeet Yadav
Serendipitous Green Meteor. Photo clicked and captioned by Prasenjeet Yadav. (Source: National Geographic)

Animal Portraits

1. Dragging you deep into the woods

Varun Aditya from Maharashtra won the first prize in Animal portraits. Aditya was in the forest on a foggy when he spotted a 20cm beauty the Green vine snake and immediately switched from the macro to the wide angle lens to snap this amazing photo.

Dragging you deep into the woods. An Indian-origin photographer Varun Aditya clicked this picture and submitted under Animal Portrait category. It won first prize. (Source: National Geographic)
Dragging you deep into the woods. An Indian-origin photographer Varun Aditya clicked this picture and submitted under Animal Portrait category. It won first prize. (Source: National Geographic)

2. Proud Momma

Second prize went to Michael O’Neill who was lucky enough to see Peacock Bass fish Momma protecting her baby fishes. He didn’t waste a single second and took a mesmerising still. This species is extra protective towards their babies and keeps them close to protect against any threat that approaches them.

Proud Momma. The second imgae in Animal Portrait category, captured by Michael O’Neill. (Source National Geographic)
Proud Momma. The second image in Animal Portrait category, captured by Michael O’Neill. (Source National Geographic)

3. Friendship knows no colour

Jose Pesquero Gomez, the photographer of this breathtaking picture, follows a quote by Luis A Ribeiro Branco, which states, ‘friendship knows no colour, nationality, race and social level, no age and gender distance.’ And with this image Gomez wants to represent the message. In the pic, two Empusa Pennata, which seem to play a game on the slim plant. This wildlife picture is certainly uncommon to see a pair of this species together.

Friendship knows no colour. Jose Pesquero Gomez’s image got third prize in the Animal Portrait category. (Source: National Geographic)
Friendship knows no colour. Jose Pesquero Gomez’s image got the third prize in the Animal Portrait category. (Source: National Geographic)

Honorable Mention

Mario Suarez Porras got the honourable mention in animal portraits category for his incredible view of an Atlantic puffin resting peacefully under the rain. The image was taken at Skomer Island, Wales, United Kingdom, which also known as the puffin colony.

Puffin studio Photo clicked and captioned by Mario Suarez Porras
Puffin studio. Photo clicked and captioned by Mario Suarez Porras. (Source: National Geographic)

Environmental Issues

1. Life and Death

The discovery of these polar bears was made at one of the islands of Northern Svalbard, by Vadim Balakin, who won first place in the Environmental Issues category. Unfortunately, it is still unknown that whether the bear has died from starving or ageing, but the good teeth status suggests starving as the reason. Nowadays, such scenarios are found very often and the global warming and ice situation influence are being suggested as a cause. Balakin stated that the image was clicked in august 2014 at Svalbard, Norway.

Life and Death. This pic of Polar Bear was taken by Vadim Balakin at at one of the islands of Northern Svalbard. It won first place in Environmental Issues category. (Source: National Geographic)
Life and Death. This pic of Polar Bear was taken by Vadim Balakin at one of the islands of Northern Svalbard. It won first place in Environmental Issues category. (Source: National Geographic)

2. Outside Facebook HQ

Chris McCann, the photographer who clicked this image said that Eighty percent of the San Francisco Bay Area wetlands, with an area of 16,500 acres, has been developed for salt mining. Before collecting the salt, water is channelled into these large ponds and leave through evaporation. In the image, the tint of each pond is an indication of its salinity. The change in the colour is due to the micro-organisms inside the pond, which makes the alteration according to the salinity of its environment. He also noted that the high salinity salt pond is located right next to Facebook HQ where around 4,000 people work every day.

Outside Facebook HQ. Chris McCann’s photo won second place in the Environmental Issues category. (Source: National Geographic)
Outside Facebook HQ. Chris McCann’s photo won second place in the Environmental Issues category. (Source: National Geographic)

3. Toxic Vanity

The image clicked by Eleanor Ryder has won third place in the Environmental Issues category. It is a magnification of plastic particles in eyeliner investigating only one aspect of the synthetic swarm hang in our oceans. The particles, lash lengthening fibres, illuminating powders and glitters these products contents are in fact tiny pieces of plastic. Whenever one washes these products from the bodies or ingests them as one lick the glosses from lips, it could be unknowingly added to the trillions of micro-plastic particles currently infesting every level of the ocean.

Toxic Vanity. This stunning image is snapped by Eleanor Ryder. It won third place in the Environmental Issues category. (Source: National Geographic)
Toxic Vanity. This stunning image is snapped by Eleanor Ryder. It won third place in the Environmental Issues category. (Source: National Geographic)

Honourable Mention

While Honourable Mention went to Sergej Chursyn who clicked a stunning picture of a young woman in the bikini looks at an approaching forest fire near the beach, at the beach of Son Serra, on the island of Mallorca on August 18, 2016.

Wildfire at the beach Photo clicked and captioned by Sergej Chursyn It won Honorable Mention in Environmental Issues (Source: National Geographic)
Wildfire at the beach Photo clicked and captioned by Sergej Chursyn It won Honorable Mention in Environmental Issues. (Source: National Geographic)

The grand-prize winner Greg Lecoeur will receive a 10-day trip for two aboard the National Geographic Endeavour to the Galápagos Islands. First prize winner in each category will receive $2,500, second prize winner in each category will get $750 and a signed National Geographic book while who stood third will receive $500 as a prize.

Nature photography is part of the fabric of National Geographic. Nat Geo has been showcasing inspiring images from around the world for more than a century. Like previous years, Nat Geo asked people give most powerful photos s for a chance to become the 2016 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

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